How to apply for summer school financial aid

Heading to summer school can get you ahead of the pack when it comes to graduation. But what about applying for summer financial aid?

Luckily, that process goes hand-in-hand with how you apply for federal financial aid at any other time of the year. You just need to make sure the money gets allocated appropriately. So, it’s best to reach out to your school and learn how to apply some of your aid to the summer semester.

Financial aid for summer school

The first step in applying for financial aid should always be to file your FAFSA®. Without filing FAFSA®, you will not be eligible for federal grants, loans, and even some scholarships.

If you are attending classes during the summer, then you should contact your school’s financial aid office and find out which school year you should file your FAFSA® for. For example, if you are attending summer school in 2021, you might need to file a ‘20- ‘21 FAFSA®, the ‘21- ‘22 application, or even both.

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To ensure you’re eligible to receive aid for summer school, you’ll need to check with your financial aid office to be sure you’re filing the correct FAFSA® application. They can also let you know of any extra steps you might need to take to get financial aid for summer.

Scholarships and Grant for Summer School

Some scholarships and grants offer year-round funding, while others are specific to summer sessions. By working with your school’s financial aid office and utilizing websites like Unigo.com, MyScholly.com, and grants.gov, you’ll be able to find aid options for summer sessions.

Private Student Loans for Summer School

If you have already reached your federal grant or loan limits, you can apply for private loans through a bank or other lender. Private lenders have more flexibility and fewer limitations – but keep in mind they do charge interest based on credit score and have stricter terms when it comes to repayment.

Keep this in mind and use this as more of a last resort for summer school as private loans will generally end up costing you more in the long run.